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FEMAP tutorials, videos, seminars, and resources


Random vibration is vibration which can only be described in a statistical sense. The magnitude at any given moment is not known, but is instead described in a statistical sense via mean values and standard deviations.

Random vibration problems arise due to earthquakes, tsunamis, acoustic excitation (e.g., rocket launches), wind fluctuations, or any loading which is inherently random. Often random noise due to operating or transporting conditions can also be considered. These random vibrations are usually described in terms of a power spectral density (PSD) function.

In this white paper we will cover steps to create a PSD analysis in FEMAP, and compare the results to an analytical solution.

UPDATED: January 9, 2017 - Updated with specific info for certain industries for a comprehensive look at PSD random vibration in FEMAP. Now with examples showing different options for PSD analysis.

 

FEMAP 11.3 is the latest user-focused release of FEMAP containing many features and enhancements requested by our users worldwide. The latest version introduces new Draw/Erase functionality to dynamically choose entities to only "Draw" in the graphics window or "Erase" from the graphics window, which may be helpful when operating on a complex model. The new "Max Quads" option available when surface meshing will minimize the number of triangular elements created when meshing with quadrilateral elements. Selection of element faces for creation of loads or connection regions has been overhauled to offer new capabilities when using certain methods and allow use of multiple selection methods during the face selection process. On the Post-Processing side, the "Vector" Contour Style has been changed to "Arrow", which now uses the Contour output vector as a "base vector" to automatically determine the type of arrow(s), select additional output vector(s), and choose appropriate options for display. Finally, results in an ABAQUS ODB file may now be "attached" and used for post-processing.

Fatal errors and/or crazy stresses!

One of the most common topics for our technical support team is Connections (also known as linear contact). You’ve seen some great demos, you’ve got the perfect pin/clevis model and you found the “Automatic” button under the Connect menu. However, once your computer finally stops spinning, the analysis crashes. Sound familiar? The goal of this seminar is to break Connections down to the simple components and provide a basic understanding of how they work. That, combined with some suggested default settings should have you up-and-running for your next contact analysis.

We presented this online technical seminar on March 24th, 2016