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FEMAP tutorials, videos, seminars, and resources


Response spectrum analysis is widely used for the design and assessment of structures that are subject to earthquakes or shock events. The reason we want to use a response spectrum is that it allows us to analyze transient events (time based events) without having to review hundreds or thousands of results sets. In essence, it allows us to assess the maximum dynamic response (stress, acceleration, velocity or displacement) of a structure using a very simple analysis technique (normal modes). Moreover all of this goodness can be had by only having to interrogate one (1) output set.

This tutorial will walk you through the theoretical background of response spectrum analysis and how to actually implement it within FEMAP & NX Nastran.

Welcome to our video-and-PDF tutorial for new and experienced FEMAP users.

In our tips & tricks video we'll show how to run a FEMAP model. We’ll go through an analysis of a pipe clamp parasolid, from importing geometry to viewing results. Every model you do in FEMAP will go through a similar workflow with differences depending upon your needs.

Additionally our PDF guide will provide clear and concise instructions for installing and configuring FEMAP v11.3. We'll walk through some basic modeling and analysis techniques while sprinkling in new features and some classic tips and tricks.

Next, we'll tackle an assembly with advanced modeling, meshing and post processing techniques.

Beam elements are very helpful in modeling structures such as space frames and bolted connections. At first glance beam elements appear simple; all that is required is a material, a cross section, orientation, and two nodes. It is important to keep in mind that this simplicity comes with some limitations. When is a beam element appropriate? What is a beam end release? Why are there stress results from 4 points? Where does the load get applied in non-symmetric beams?

This webinar was presented on June 23, 2016