FEMAP tutorials, videos, seminars, and resources



Brian, Adrian and the whole FEMAP support team have done a great job wrestling with user questions ever since v12 kicked in. One of the biggest sources of user head scratching has been dealing with layers and best methods for model organization. With that in mind we held a March webinar, and have since carved a series of 7 or so videos that deal with model flow and model organization. We hope you find these shorter segments helpful.

Model organization is an incredibly important but often overlooked aspect of FE analysis. With the increasing size and complexity of models it is more important than ever to be able to create, navigate and post process models in a fast efficient manner. Groups and Layers are effective ways to organize and manipulate models during construction, analysis and post processing.

Model organization is an incredibly important but often overlooked aspect of FE analysis. With the increasing size and complexity of models it is more important than ever to be able to create, navigate and post process models in a fast efficient manner. Groups and Layers are effective ways to organize and manipulate models during construction, analysis and post processing.

This seminar covers a variety of uses for both layers and groups in constructing geometry, meshing, solving, and post processing along with the changes to the commands introduced in V12. It looks at the differences between groups and layers and when it may be beneficial to use one over the other.

We held this online seminar on Thursday, March 7, 2019

Please be advised that FEMAP v12.0.1a is now available. FEMAP v12.0.1a addresses several issues, some of which were introduced in v12.0.1 and others which existed in both v12.0.1 and v12.0.

FEMAP v12.0.1a is 100% licensing and database compatible with v12.0 and v12.0.1.

Our team at Applied CAx took a look at this update and have determined this update as not something mandatory but if you are using an older version and are ready to move to v12, it's a good fit.

A simulation engineer’s review of FEA bolt modeling practices from basic to complex. We cover standard bolt modeling techniques and more advanced techniques to incorporate bolt preload. Comments are added on pros and cons of the various techniques and when it might be necessary to include bolt preload for fatigue analysis.

Seminar by: George Laird, PhD, PE  Principal Mechanical Engineer, Predictive Engineering and CAE Director, Applied CAx

We held this live online seminar held on Dec. 13, 2018

All finite element analysts know this experience – take a single piece of solid CAD geometry, auto-mesh it, apply the boundary and analyze the model. It will be quick, easy and you think you will have some results ready to document in time to leave the office at a reasonable hour… and then the model crashes and the goose chase begins. Sometimes the simplest analysis projects can suck up a ridiculous amount of time.

In this technical seminar, we want to get back to the basics and talk about why it’s not always so basic. This presentation will walk through the standard analysis workflow from geometry to stress results and take a look at some of the common pitfalls. Along the way, we'll share with you some of our time saving techniques. We'll be working with solid geometry and tetrahedral meshes as we explore geometry preparation, mesh quality, model verification tools and finally, some recommended post-processing practices.

This webinar was held on:
Thursday, June 7, 2018
8:30am - 9:30am Pacific Time

This seminar was held on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017

Despite continuous improvements in software and hardware, there’s still need for idealization and engineering judgement when it comes to creating effective FEA models. Yes, with today’s computational horsepower it’s possible to pull in a complex CAD assembly, put a fine tet-mesh on it, set up automatic connections and let it spin for a few hours. But your productivity might not be the best and it also puts you in a tight position for performing checks or sensitivity analyses or performing what-if scenarios. And most likely, you don’t want to lug around a million node model - debugging, run times, and data management all become quite painful with models of that size.

A more elegant approach is to follow the lead of FEA veterans and use a global-local modeling or breakout modeling approach. Global-local modeling takes a very large assembly and reduces it to something that is quick and easy to optimize. Another way to view global-local modeling is like an advanced form of FE symmetry – if it works for your simulation it is like free money.

This seminar covers a variety of FEMAP and NX Nastran topics relevant to global-local modeling from generating interface loads with freebody diagrams to extracting sub-sections of your model with the Select Toolbar.