FEMAP tutorials, videos, seminars, and resources


This quick tutorial covers the challenge of an axisymmetric model with contact. We start from the basics and then show an example courtesy of one of our clients. We came up with this rather complex challenge and to solve it we started simply with a 2D plate with a hole then we moved to something axisymmetric. At the very end we were able to check it against our real model.

This five-minute-tutorial provides an introduction to the world of composite laminate modeling. From creating a 2D orthotropic material to using APIs to assist in post processing, this jam-packed tutorial covers our standard workflow. In fact it’s so jam packed, we had to add a couple extra minutes!

OUTLINE:

  • Composite Material (2D Orthotropic) – UD Carbon Fiber
  • 9-ply Symmetric Layup (45°/-45°/0°/90°/0°/90°/0°/-45°/45°)
  • Laminate Property with Hill Failure Theory
  • Meshing – just like standard plate elements
  • Material Orientation – the reference angle
  • Post Processing – deflection, stress and failure indices

Sometimes it’s the simple things that make life easier and so, this webinar provides a grab-bag of tips, tricks and new features in FEMAP v11.4. Plus we look at the top 10 things we love about FEMAP.

This seminar should provide useful for everybody from new users to FEMAP veterans. We presented this live online seminar on Thursday, August 3, 2017

In this technical seminar, we look at how to extract weld line stresses and forces. Our assumption is that a post-weld heat treatment has been performed and that the residual stress state in the weld zone is quite low.

To illustrate this importance, we provide an FEA simulation of how residual stresses develop in a welded T-joint as it cools down to room temperature. Please don’t get your hopes up that this seminar will be the definitive work on weld modeling and analysis, the topic is just too broad to cover in an hour or even in a week of lectures. What we will show is our best practices at Predictive Engineering from ASME to Blodgett's.

This webinar was held on Thursday, May 4, 2017.

Response spectrum analysis is widely used for the design and assessment of structures that are subject to earthquakes or shock events. The reason we want to use a response spectrum is that it allows us to analyze transient events (time based events) without having to review hundreds or thousands of results sets. In essence, it allows us to assess the maximum dynamic response (stress, acceleration, velocity or displacement) of a structure using a very simple analysis technique (normal modes). Moreover all of this goodness can be had by only having to interrogate one (1) output set.

This tutorial will walk you through the theoretical background of response spectrum analysis and how to actually implement it within FEMAP & NX Nastran.

Welcome to our video-and-PDF tutorial for new and experienced FEMAP users.

In our tips & tricks video we'll show how to run a FEMAP model. We’ll go through an analysis of a pipe clamp parasolid, from importing geometry to viewing results. Every model you do in FEMAP will go through a similar workflow with differences depending upon your needs.

Additionally our PDF guide will provide clear and concise instructions for installing and configuring FEMAP v11.3. We'll walk through some basic modeling and analysis techniques while sprinkling in new features and some classic tips and tricks.

Next, we'll tackle an assembly with advanced modeling, meshing and post processing techniques.

Beam elements are very helpful in modeling structures such as space frames and bolted connections. At first glance beam elements appear simple; all that is required is a material, a cross section, orientation, and two nodes. It is important to keep in mind that this simplicity comes with some limitations. When is a beam element appropriate? What is a beam end release? Why are there stress results from 4 points? Where does the load get applied in non-symmetric beams?

This webinar was presented on June 23, 2016

Random vibration is vibration which can only be described in a statistical sense. The magnitude at any given moment is not known, but is instead described in a statistical sense via mean values and standard deviations.

Random vibration problems arise due to earthquakes, tsunamis, acoustic excitation (e.g., rocket launches), wind fluctuations, or any loading which is inherently random. Often random noise due to operating or transporting conditions can also be considered. These random vibrations are usually described in terms of a power spectral density (PSD) function.

In this white paper we will cover steps to create a PSD analysis in FEMAP, and compare the results to an analytical solution.

UPDATED: January 9, 2017 - Updated with specific info for certain industries for a comprehensive look at PSD random vibration in FEMAP. Now with examples showing different options for PSD analysis.